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Buenos Aires
martes, noviembre 12, 2019

Forza Horizon 4

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

La CTA aprobó su reincorporación a la CGT

“Por unanimidad, la CTA se encamina hacia la unidad de la clase trabajadora con la CGT”, sintetizó el titular de la CTA de los Argentinos, Hugo Yasky, tras la votación del plenario general de la organización en el estadio de Lanús, donde se puso fin a lo que calificó como “un paréntesis de tres décadas”. “¡Y ya lo ve! ¡y ya lo ve! ¡hay una sola CGT!” fue el canto de los delegados.

La votación se produjo frente al candidato presidencial del Frente de  Todos, Alberto Fernández, quien recibió otras dos votaciones de impacto inmediato para sus aspiraciones: el respaldo a la fórmula Fernández-Fernández y “el mandato para participar del diálogo de la concertación social”, en un eventual gobierno del Frente de Todos a partir de diciembre. 

Yasky destacó los cuatro años de movilización popular en las calles durante la gestión Cambiemos y mencionó a los dirigentes gremiales que lo acompañaron, entre ellos, Pablo Michelli, Hugo Moyano, Sergio Palazzo y Omar Plaini, “con quien alguna vez soñamos que la unidad era posible”, destacó.

Con esos dirigentes a sus espaldas, sentados al lado de Fernández y Máximo Kirchner, a las candidatas a vicejefas bonaerense y porteñas, Verónica Magario y Gisela Marziotta, Yasky advirtió que “hace falta unidad para poder ganar la elección que viene, pero hace falta mucha más unidad para poder gobernar un país que va a quedar destruido, endeudado, empobrecido y con desempleo”.

El titular de la CTA analizó que, lo que permitió que “el pueblo argentino tenga una nueva oportunidad”, fue no solo la presencia de los movimientos sociales y gremiales en las calles durante los años de macrismo —no estuvieron presentes los gremios de la CGT que se mostraron cercanos a la Casa Rosada durante los primeros años de Cambiemos— sino también “la capacidad de construir unidad cuando fue intervenido el Partido Justicialista”.

Trials Fusion

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

NBA Live 19

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

Medieval Steve

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

GT Sport

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

Wolfenstein II

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

Lamplight City

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

Soul Calibur VI

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

Alien: Isolation

Kratos has changed. Not just his beard; he’s older, more haggard and weary. He’s a man who has seen too much.

As far as allegories for the franchise go, Kratos is a good one. After seven entries of thoughtlessly smashing and killing just about everyone in the Greek pantheon, he and his games came dangerously close to sinking into the oblivion of franchise fatigue. No wonder he’s tired.

The newest God of War, brought to us by Cory Barlog, and the same Santa Monica Studios that brought us the original, elevates everything about the franchise. It takes what worked, what was iconic and meaningful amidst the juvenile testosterone power fantasy, and examines it in the light of a new setting, with a new emphasis on telling a compelling story.

Part of why the narrative is so remarkably convincing is the excellent capture and voice performances by Christopher Judge as Kratos and Sunny Suljic as his young son. Their chemistry absolutely sells the epic story, and manages to effortlessly overcome the occasionally melodramatic dialogue. God of War is a very well written game, with a fascinating and original take on the Norse pantheon, but all of that would be wasted if the acting wasn’t up to par. Other games would do well to learn from this emphasis on quality performances.

Kratos is still Kratos, still sullen and tortured, but now that he and the world around him are getting the attention they deserve, he’s also so much more.

The combat system is less combo heavy than its predecessors, and the new over the shoulder perspective lends itself to a more tactful and methodical approach to the plentiful hostile encounters. Being able to switch between two weapons and hand-to-hand adds a huge variety of options to combat. Kratos’ Leviathan axe is a particular standout; I never grew tired of decapitating Draugr by hurling it across the room, only to hit triangle and have it fly back into Kratos’ hand like the deadliest boomerang in all the realms.

The franchise has always been ridiculous, and even the earliest entries have always been fun, if simplistic fun. It knew what it was; a gleeful celebration of excessive masculinity and violence, and though there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, the new God of War is better in just about every regard. It still has violence aplenty, still provides the satisfaction of cinematic victory and breathtaking set pieces, but also provides a meaningful story, highly polished gameplay, and an incredibly detailed and beautiful world to explore.

Ultimas noticias

Alien: Isolation

Battlefield 5

Train Simulator 2018

Medieval Steve